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drinks to avoid f.d.a. oversight. we've called on the agency to regulate energy drinks that have caffeine levels well above the 71 milligrams per 12-ounce threshold in soft drinks. today senator blumenthal and i asked the f.d.a. commissioner to meet with us to personally meet with us after thanksgiving to discuss the steps the f.d.a. is taking to ensure the safety of energy drinks. every other week we're seeing mounting evidence that energy drinks pose safety risks. you learn about young people hospitalized or seriously hurt after consuming what are marketed as little energy pick pick-me-ups. we look forward to working with commissioner hamburg to protect our children and to protect everyone in america from these die tear supplements, whether it is 5-hour energy or the monster energy drink which led to the death of this 14-year-old girl in maryland. mr. president, it's been many years since came to this floor and argued about dietary supplements. we all know what's involved here. i always preface my remarks by saying when i got up this morning i took my vitamin, i took my fish oi
and what we might see in the coming decades with abundant cost of energy supplies that could have a dramatic impact on what we might see in terms of being able to proceed with a manufacturing growth in manufacturing continuation of employment here that is not independent on the innovation or high-tech industries which we should very much be supporting. that's something to keep an eye on. >> i'm glad you mentioned energy because i was getting very depressed talking about the middle class i think it is the single biggest issue in america today. will be part of the energy solution. >> i wish that i had included that because heidi is completely right. it is a great thing that is happening in terms of the availability in the natural gas where as you know it isn't a well liked commodity where it's produced which means if you have as much of it as we have at the moment, the price is low relative to the cost of oil and therefore we can attract energy intensive manufacturing in north dakota and eastern ohio to wherever to take advantage of it and that is a great thing and i don't want to m
but continuing with the theme of abundance, we will see the development of an energy surplus because of technological advances in exploiting both oil and natural gas resources, combined with new energy efficiency measures that will greatly reduce u.s. energy use. now the u.s. is now predicted, the international energy agency, predicts the u.s. will be the, will be the number one producer of oil by 2020. it will also be probably close to the top in the producers of natural gas. this will give us the wealth and income, mike lindh mentioned -- lind, mentioned 1 1/2% of gdp, we have 16 to 20 years to make up for the short fall in, in social security and 4 to 5% in medicare. well, the explosion of a moving from a energy deficit to a energy surplus will more than half close that gdp gap. so, we have a economic conditions that suggest that the challenges we face are the exact opposite of what the bowles-simpson grand bargain would impose on us as a growth strategy. the conditions that we're going to face over the next five to eight years with some amelioration if we do the right things are
energy was spent on health care and other things coming into the question is do you see that -- how do you strike that balance and do you see that changing as you go forward into the next four years? >> to complicate your questions about what the balance in the short term and the immediate and long-term things that matter for the strength of the economy and i think it's important to recognize that as we get to the next phase of the fiscal reform debate you have to think about this not just about how you bring them down gradually to the point they are sustainable you to think about it in terms of what can you do to improve the long-term growth in the american economy? there are things we have to do in infrastructure and education just to name to that are important to the potential of the country and are not very expensive. if we sacrifice those objectives in the interest of getting more fiscal restraint more quickly than is desirable would do damage across the country, so i would just encourage people to look at -- we want to look at things that are good for growth now and over the long
technological revolution has reenergize the american north american energy market and is fundamentally reshaping global politics short -- toward the traditional powers in the west rather than away from them, you think about drones, the war on terror, technology has allowed a lead foot print that is far more effective in many respects, at least at the specific task of getting bad guys without much direct involvement on the ground than anybody would ever have imagined a few years ago. it's a changing technological environment working to overturn established powered orders or to reinforce establish power orders. >> that is open to all of you. >> as you say, this is an ebb and flow and always has been, just as the american sense of one we want to intervene and when we want to pull back. whether you believe it is a 70 year cycle or in a year cycle or whatever, the technological flow goes in a much faster cycle. so in the past ten years, for sure, i think it has reinforced american power because, as you look at what president bush was doing in his second term, what president obama has doubled down on
to the committee on energy with instructions to report back the following amendment, number 2880. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that motion. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. reid: i have an amendment to the instructions. that's also at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposes amendment numbered 2881 to the instructions on the motion to commit s. 3525. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that amendment. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. reid: i have a second-degree amendment at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposes amendment numbered 2882 to amendment numbered 2881. mr. reid: i have a cloture motion on the bill that is already at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: cloture motion. we, the undersigned senators in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the st
, afghanistan/pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. so starting with that, looking at it strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? um, if not, what would you change, what would you add? >> i -- when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs councils went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues, and congratulations to you. i think you have them just right. i think there is an overarching issue on top of all of them that in some sense effects and enables all of them x that is if you look at at the national security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic
and take your, take your energy? that is -- information. that is example of unfairness. we brought 100 examples of spam cases many based on unfairness. 40 data security cases using unfairness. those are examples where i think you want us to use this statute. this is a statute that congress gave us in 1939 to prohibit unfair deceptive acts or practices. >> wyndham case is fair example. it didn't protect their credit card data. >> what we allege, yes. >> 500,000 credit card numbers ended up in the hands of a russian company. >> can neither confirm or deny that. that is certainly the allegation. i don't think even they deny it. >> i guess you brought that. >> involving multiple hacks. not first time or second time. perhaps as many as three. >> one thing i wonder about, one criticism of the ftc you didn't do anything to google for their overcollection of wi-fi information and i don't know how much you can say about that by that, part of the problem there was they didn't say they wouldn't do it. so it wasn't deceptive. they never said i'm not going to collect everybody's information over wi
've spent the the time and energy to put them on about. because of the coalitions, and with them come out with the religious are you what you saw were fair-minded religious leaders and faith leaders in the accounting what they were sent to that something that we have seen as aggressively in the past. they also are losing support. you were saying, i was on a panel today, this is much more exciting with brian brown who runs the national organization for marriage, and he is desperately spinning, and he talks about the left liberal states but he also talks about how they were outspent this thing. well, they have seen their support shrink. a have seen can be are not going to go away and they learn the lessons. i think they could come back in a very force away, but it seemed their support shrink the they've seen their grassroots support shrink and they've seen their donor base shrink. the mormon church is a play that you did not see in these four campaigns but they were the dominant player in prop eight. also saw a lot of individual donors on the outside. not do this thing. where's on the proto
-- we have to be a party of ideas and constantly harness our new ideas and the energy around those ideas and help some of the individual store to be part of the party going forward and so i think that he will try to help them too. secure with the president in iowa, a very emotional pleas for him. give us a little short picture of what it was like being with him as it was coming to an end. >> he's not a very publicly emotional guy as most people know. he said later that he was struck. he knew everybody's tired, your all the walking dead. every reporter you are trying to make it, but he looked out that night and saw all these faces of these people that believed in him and were with him in 2007 and i don't mean random basis, i mean people he actually recognized and new and kind of waved at him and waved back and that struck him and i think it really impacted him and you could see he got a little emotional that might and he was very receptive. it sounds like governor romney was as well and i remember the morning of the election we were waiting to do the interview and he said you know, i thou
decisions that have been made about the depreciation and manufacturing and the energy industry all of which have significant constituencies behind them and all of which are difficult to address. islamic of course we haven't had a whole lot of folks at least i've heard of that have suggested anything other than revenue neutral corporate tax reform of the community will offer much in terms of new revenue. >> part of the president's answer to that peter can no doubt say much more about it is to not make the distinction between the corporate and the unincorporated business and raise taxes for the entities and large partnerships that might otherwise have been corporations and tell us what we should be worrying about. >> a couple comments. first, i think there is no doubt that the corporate income tax in particular is a rickety structure of this point that is in need of reform, and fundamentally it is coming about because we are in a world in which capitalism is increasingly mobile, but we have got this boundary around the corporate income tax based on the national boundary, and there is just ten
what frequencies are we using the electronic magnetic spectrum? how much energy are we putting out there? our people measuring it? and do we know what we need to know about that? the answer was you know, we did a pretty good job at this during the cold war some of you may remember the mission control and that was a consistent effort that we had but not so much now because frankly we just haven't had to do that. so we need to do i guess what i would call take care of our electromagnetic hygiene to know how much energy we are putting out there that is being picked up if you will and how we use the frequency, can we hope frequency as we build new systems because it would be important because a lot of our potential lover series and a lot of new systems are coming in that measure exactly that. some electronic magnum and spectrum lenni to understand our dominance in the undersea domain and that is continuing and network approach. it's important to have submarines. they are the main part of dominance in the domain. but it's also a matter of having systems. it is the aircraft, its systems
underutilization of capital i equipment. the one issue we need to face is resource costs and energy prices. that is not a question which is being driven by overuse at the moment, it's being driven by other factors. i'm not as optimistic as stephanie is about the long-term potential path, but is there a trade-off between what we should do to protect our elderly population and to provide adequate medical care to the whole poppation and what we should do to reconstruct our infrastructure and address energy and climate issues? no. we are underperforming on both fronts. >> but there's a -- it's not a budget tear trade-off, it's -- budgetary trade-off, as long as we think revenues can only be this high, then there's a fight among those priorities. we have to accept having higher revenues to pay for the things we want. that softens that trade-off. the entitlements are not, are not a drain on real resources, they're a transfer. but there is a question of public sector investment versus what's going on in the private sector. when we're at full capacity, we have that trade-off. but the issue is, um,
on tax reform, and then work on these problems like energy, comprehensive energy problems that are opportunity and making. so i am much were optimistic than some. imagine hubert humphrey. actually the original he gave me gordon humphrey suggested by mistake or little-known senator from new hampshire. but eventually they corrected it. >> the president has just given a press covers but i do not get the chance to hear it but he was sounding feisty on the issue of taxes. he seemed to be saying that he was given a mandate in this election by the american people, not to continue with tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. he said if there is one difference between mitt romney and his campaign, it was that he opposes the idea of the wealthiest continuing to have those tax cuts. if that is the position of the president and it continues to be the position of the democrats, isn't going to hold things up in terms of budget negotiation with republican colleagues? >> i look at this one simple way and that is i want to bring the debt debt. when you look at the bush tax cuts, and the way
of their energy and time focused on their ill health, where the ramifications of that were family members, there's just not much space for doing the things we'd like to see. so we have great ideas, wonderful examples of governments and education and so forth that we have seen and would like to spread. people don't have time for them, can't focus on it. and the vacancy -- the vacuum created by that basic security invites trouble. in my experience, this is where problems are. as i look around the world, there are a few areas that are well educated and well defined, but there are vast areas that troubles some, that are hallmarks by lack of stability and security and so forth. so i think in my mind, decent dvd. not every case because it's a good quote. lots of different situations, but that's when. the chama manufacturing front and that will get the uniform in the back there. right here, sir. >> i am from the national institute of allergy and disease at nah. before that i was on the army retired medical blog. i was actually recruited to nih because they military background because 12 years ago, the
after the election. so thank you very much, sir. >> coming up tonight, a house energy and commerce subcommittee hears testimony on the fungal meningitis outbreak linked to a massachusetts company. the defense department and holds a briefing on actions taken after an investigation into misconduct. at laflin air force base in san antonio. that is followed by an interview with outgoing house services member, congressman barney frank. today's of nonfiction books this weekend. your calls, e-mails, and tweets. many featured authors including jake tapper and christopher hitchens book, mortality. live coverage starts on saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. eastern on sunday at noon on c-span2's booktv. join us online
years we've seen a dramatic increase in sale of energy drinks in america, common fixtures in grocery stores, gas station, convenience stores, everywhere you turn. they target young people. the flashy ads and names like monster and rock star and with claims to increase attention, stamina and even to help with weight loss. according to one study, 30% to 50% of adolescents, teenagers, consume energy drinks. sadly, as the sale of energy drinks has grown, so has the alarming evidence that these energy drinks pose a potential threat to our nation's health. yesterday "the new york times" featured an article that found that the food and drug administration has received 13 adverse event reports for people who died -- who died -- after consuming 5-hour energy drinks. just last month news reports found that five people died -- five -- after consuming monster energy drinks. this last may i met the mother and family of a 14-year-old, anise fournier from maryland. this lovely young teenager lost her life last december when she went into cardiac arrest caused by caffeine toxicity after she tkrafrpb
energy. we need to renew that production tax credit. it's encouraged billions of dollars in investment and helped create tens of thousands of good-paying moobs across our country -- american jobs across our country. but i have to tell your our inaction here is jeopardizing the future of what's really a promising industry. we've literally over the last months seen wind industry jobs in the thousands disappear. that's not a statistic, not just a statement, those jobs affected real americans. and these job losses were completely preventible. and it's time for us to get back to work and extend the production tax credit so that our wind energy industry can also get back to work. and one of the things i've done, mr. president, i've come to the floor some 20-plus times, is focus on an individual state. i want today talk about a state that has incredible potential for wind power. and that's montana. the last best place as montanans like to describe their amazing state. and like almost every state in the country, montana's seen the jobs, clean energy and economic benefits of wind power. i want
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18